KUSA—It was the type of contract that called for a press conference.

The San Francisco 49ers had just made their 7-0-in-seven-career-starts quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo the richest player in NFL history with a deal that averaged $27.5 million a year.

Team general manager John Lynch, the franchise quarterback and head coach Kyle Shanahan must have texted each other before the presser because all three wore fitted sports coats, well-pressed dress shirts and zero ties.

Beware the record-setting contract press conference.

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo (10) throws against the Los Angeles Rams during the first half at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Dec. 31, 2017.

In the previous seven seasons, teams whose quarterback signed that year’s richest contract averaged just 6.6 wins in season one of their new deal.

Or a fraction more than the 49ers won in 2017 thanks to Garoppolo’s 5-0 finish.

Let the Broncos take note as they consider whether to pursue the biggest prize in free agency next month: Washington quarterback Kirk Cousins.

If Garoppolo got $27.5 million a year, then the floor for the more accomplished Cousins is expected to be $28 million per.

Although these record-setting deals or extensions have often eventually reaped dividends for teams -- Green Bay, Atlanta, New Orleans and Seattle probably would not have enjoyed deep postseason runs in recent years without Aaron Rodgers, Matt Ryan, Drew Brees or Russell Wilson -- in most cases, there are often setbacks in year 1 of these enormous contracts.

Because the back-end of multiyear contracts are almost never guaranteed, the stars get a large percentage of their money front-loaded in bonuses. That means a hefty cash payout in year 1.

The $50 million signing bonus in the five-year contract extension for Detroit’s Matthew Stafford last summer may average out to $10 million a year for salary-cap purposes. But that $50 million in first-year cash didn’t leave the Lions with much in reserves to upgrade their running game, receiver corps or below-average defense.

Garoppolo’s new deal will present a similar challenge for Lynch and Shanahan as they reconfigure the rest of their 49ers’ roster. In terms of annual average, Garoppolo’s $27.5 million did not soar to another galaxy. It was just a little more than the $27 million average for Stafford, who got a little more than Derek Carr, who got a tad more than Andrew Luck.

But the $42.6 million Garoppolo will receive in the first year of his deal is a whopping $20.1 million more than what Carr will get as the second-highest paid player in 2018 cash.

And that’s for a quarterback who stayed with his existing team. Garoppolo and Carr probably won’t be 1-2 in 2018 payout for long. Give Cousins a multi-team bid in the free-agent process and he could exceed Stafford’s $51 million year-one outlay.

Even though most of the blame for the Broncos’ disappointing 2017 season has been placed on their quarterback play, 5-11 suggests there are many other positions in need of an upgrade.

So, should the Broncos pursue Cousins? Only if they want to have their quarterback position solidified for the next five years. History, however, suggests fans for the 49ers and Cousins’ new team shouldn’t be surprised if success is not immediate.

A look at the richest, first-year payouts for newly signed contracts in each of the previous seven years, and how the respective teams fared in the first year of those mega, quarterback contracts (source Spotrac):

2017

QB, team ………......…… Year 1 cash payout …. W-L

M. Stafford, DET …......… $51 million …….........…. 9-7

Derek Carr, OAK …......… $25.2 million …............ 6-10

2016

Andrew Luck, IND …....... $44 million ..........……… 8-8

Drew Brees, NO ......…… $31.25 million ..….......... 7-9

Joe Flacco, BAL ……...... $29 million ……..........… 8-8

2015

Eli Manning, NYG …..…. $37 million …............... 6-10

B. Roethlisberger, PIT … $35.3 million ............… 10-6

Philip Rivers, SD ………. $32 mill …..........…....... 4-12

Russell Wilson, SEA ….. $31.7 mill ….................. 10-6

2014

Matt Ryan, ATL ….……. $36.5 million ….............. 6-10

2013

Aaron Rodgers, GB ….. $38.25 million ............… 8-7-1

Flacco, BAL …………... $30 million ……................ 8-8

Tony Romo, DAL …….. $26.5 million …................. 8-8

2012

Brees, NO……………... $40 million ........……........ 7-9

Matt Schaub, HOU ….. $21.9 million ................... 12-4

P. Manning, DEN ……. $18 million …................... 13-3

2011

Sam Bradford, STL …………. $26.8 million ......… 2-14

Peyton Manning, IND ……..... $26.4 million …...... 2-14

Joe Flacco and the Baltimore Ravens are a separate cautionary tale. Flacco led the Ravens to the postseason each of the first five seasons he played on his rookie contract, a run that culminated with his Super Bowl MVP performance to cap the 2012 season.

But the Ravens have only reached the playoffs once in their five seasons since they gave Flacco not one, but two huge contract extensions. Flacco and the Ravens were 9-4 in the playoffs through his first five seasons; 1-1 in their next five years.

Historical evidence like this will have the Broncos falling in love with the quarterback likes of Josh Allen, Sam Darnold, Josh Rosen or Baker Mayfield as potential selections with the team’s No. 5 overall draft pick.

Then again, recent history says the Broncos struck it rich with Peyton Manning through an expensive, free-agent purchase, but have so far missed on the first-round pick that was Paxton Lynch.

There is no blueprint. When it comes to finding a quarterback who can lead a team to multiple Super Bowls at fair value, good luck.