There’s a story behind every Bronze Star Medal, though some may be forgotten. Jeremy and Marilyn Meyers know there must be a story behind the medal they found in a box next to a dumpster a couple years ago.

“[We] immediately kept them because they shouldn’t be thrown away in a box of papers just sitting on the side of dumpster,” Jeremy Meyers said.

Jeremy was working as the maintenance manager at the Torrey Pines apartment complex in Denver when he spotted two small cases sitting in boxes. Inside the cases were various pins and medals along with a Bronze Star. The couple has kept them in storage ever since.

“Now we’re trying to find somebody to give them back to,” he said.

The Bronze Star Medal held a single clue – a name engraved on its back. Ronald W. Taylor.

Jeremy and Marilyn Meyers know there must be a story behind the medal they found in a box next to a dumpster a couple years ago.

Jeremy’s wife, Marilyn, reached out to 9NEWS in hopes of tracking down Taylor or his family.

“If that was my family – if that was my uncle or my grandfather, I would definitely want [the medals] back, so it just means a lot to get them back home,” she said.

A check of burial records at Fort Logan National Cemetery revealed a Ronald W. Taylor died Sept. 6, 2015 at the age of 90. His gravestone indicates he served in World War II and received the Bronze Star Medal. Fort Logan didn’t have any record of Taylor’s family members. A spokesman said Taylor’s “next of kin” was listed as All Veterans Funeral and Cremation. The funeral home didn’t have record of Taylor’s family either. A spokeswoman said the funeral home would be willing to make a display case for Ronald W. Taylor’s medals if no family members come forward.

Jeremy and Marilyn Meyers know there must be a story behind the medal they found in a box next to a dumpster a couple years ago.

Marilyn and Jeremy Meyers don’t know the story behind the medals they found, but they want to honor the man who served like those in their own family. The Meyers’ eldest son, Michael, is a student at George Washington High School and cadet with the U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps.

“I have a very big love for the military,” Marilyn said. “I respect our vets. I respect our troops.”

The Meyers are caretakers of the medals for now. They want to bring them home.

“I’d love to hand them over and maybe give them a handshake or a hug and say thank you for his service,” Jeremy said.