Happy Thursday, OP friends! What do porn stars and North Korea and tariffs all have in common?

Yep. Exactly.

Keep up with the latest, subscribe here and let's go.

The calm before the Stormy

President Trump doesn't want Stormy Daniels to talk.

And this could backfire.

According to legal experts, if the president admits to being a party to an agreement that paid Daniels to stay quiet, the Federal Election Commission might view this as a violation of campaign finance law.

"If the hush payment violated election law, then this lawsuit and the procedural dilemmas concerning the enforcement of the arbitration agreement have placed Trump in a Catch-22 situation if he or the company seeks to compel arbitration," Imre Szalai, a national expert on arbitration law with the Loyola University School of Law in New Orleans, wrote on his blog.

Meaning: They might just want to let Daniels share those salacious details herself.

But who has the bigger button?

President Trump will meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un by May, according to a South Korean official.

What are they going to talk about? Moving toward a nuclear-free Korean peninsula.

How did this happen? A South Korean delegation's arrival in Washington on Thursday.

"I told President Trump that in our meeting, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said he's committed to denuclearization. He pledged that North Korea will refrain from any further nuclear or missile tests," South Korean national security adviser Chung Eui-yong told reporters.

It's tariff time

Potential trade war? Bring it, because President Trump on Thursday signed proclamations imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.

According to the White House, the plan does exempt Canada and Mexico from the tariffs, pending ongoing trade negotiations.

"We have to protect and build our steel and aluminum industries, while at the same time showing great flexibility and cooperation toward those that are really friends of ours," Trump said.

And hey: It could work out really well for Indiana (if Jeff Flake doesn't get in the way).

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