If you’ve lived in Colorado for a while, Oct. 24, 1997 is a day you most definitely remember.

A storm walloped the Front Range, dumping two feet of snow on the Denver metro area and closing Interstate 25 from New Mexico to Wyoming.

Even crazier? Four feet fell on Coal Creek Canyon.

A storm dumped two feet of snow on Metro Denver on Oct. 24, 1997

It left many people stranded on the roads and at Denver International Airport -- in fact, 100 cars were also abandoned along Pena Boulevard after getting stuck in the snow.

RELATED: The 1997 blizzard changed storm response

Wind gusts reached 60 miles per hour, and the city was at a standstill.

A storm dumped two feet of snow on Metro Denver on Oct. 24, 1997

But, despite all this, Denver International Airport stayed open -- even though now, it has a different approach and will often err on the side of caution.

And the airlines themselves have started waiving change fees to discourage people from braving Pena in rough conditions.

While the weather coming up this week isn't nearly as crazy, Colorado will still see a more than 30 degree temperature drop from Wednesday into Thursday.

It's proof that Colorado weather doing its own thing isn't new.