Then and Now: Harry Potter stars from the Sorcerer's Stone to today

In 1997, we were first introduced to the wizarding world, a realm of muggles and witches and wizards, of wands and Hogwarts and Diagon Alley.

HOGWARTS - Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone first graced British bookshelves on this day, June 26, 20 years ago. 

In 1997, we were first introduced to the wizarding world, a realm of muggles and witches and wizards, of wands and Hogwarts and Diagon Alley. 

The first book, known in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, was released as a movie in 2001. 

The world was introduced to Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe), Hermione Granger (Emma Watson), Ron Weasley (Rubert Grint) and all the literary characters on the big screen for the first time. 

For those of us who are Harry Potter fans, we were blessed to see these actors and actresses blossom from pre-pubescent pre-teens to fully grown adults from 2001 until 2011. 

Bless them for growing into even more beautiful (and less awkward) people over the past two decades.

Let's just say, puberty is a magical thing. (We're looking at you, Neville Longbottom). 

Happy 20th Birthday, Wizarding World of Harry Potter. Here's a look back at the stars of the film series from 2001 until today.

Draco Malfoy (played by Tom Felton)

Mobile users see Draco's transformation here.

Dudley Dursley (played by Harry Melling)

Mobile users see Dudley's transformation here.

Seamus Finnegan (played by Devon Murray)

Mobile users see Seamus' transformation here

Hermione Granger (played by Emma Watson)

Mobile users see Hermione's transformation here

Ron Weasley (played by Rupert Grint)

Mobile users see Ron's transformation here

Ginny Weasley (played by Bonnie Wright)

Mobile users see Ginny's transformation here

Fred and George Weasley (played by James and Oliver Phelps)

Mobile users see the Weasley twins' transformation here.

Harry Potter (played by Daniel Radcliffe)

Mobile users see Harry's transformation here

Neville Longbottom (played by Matthew Lewis)

Mobile users see Neville's transformation here.

There's a reason why the phrase "Longbottom-ed so hard" is used in popular culture today. 

Thank you, Matthew Lewis. Thank you. 

© 2017 KUSA-TV


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