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Clinical trial for Viagra for women

11:40 AM, Nov 21, 2012   |    comments
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To paraphrase what the Rolling Stones so famously complained about - millions of women can't get ultimate satisfaction in the bedroom, even though they try.

"Once they've lost it, they're tremendously frustrated and distressed," Sheryl Kingsberg with UH Case Medical Center in Cleveland said.

At least 5 percent of all women suffer from a disorder in which they can no longer reach the peak of their sexual experiences. A disorder called anorgasmia - or female orgasmic disorder - is defined as the persistent or recurrent delay and/or absence of an orgasm.

Enter Dr. Kingsberg who is leading a clinical trial of a potential treatment.

Tefina is a nasal gel that delivers a dose of testosterone directly to the brain.

"This allows for a woman who's taking it to have a response within 30 minutes," Dr. Kingsberg said. "And, it clears out of her system within 24 hours."

Doctors say there are no hormonal side effects like hair growth or a deepened voice. Medications like Viagra to treat erectile dysfunction in men have been on the market for 14 years - generating billions in sales. But, no similar drugs are approved to treat women even though nearly half suffer from some sort of sexual problem.

"Finally, we're catching up a little, and culture is supporting the idea that women deserve treatment," Dr. Kingsberg said.

The clinical trial is expected to last four months.

Dr. John Torres spoke about this clinical trial Wednesday morning and also addressed viewer questions:

Question #1
Can you please tell us your view on Cancer and IV vitamin C? Will it eliminate the cancer cells from your body? Can something so simple really help us? Nancy

Answer
The theory behind vitamin C being used to fight cancer dates back to 1976. At that time it was proposed that high dose vitamin C, given through an IV, could stop cancer cells from growing. Unfortunately, the original studies that showed good results weren't well done and subsequent studies haven't really found any benefit to this type of treatment. There has been some recent use of IV high dose vitamin C in conjunction with chemotherapy that appears to work in some limited cases to treat certain types of cancer. In these cases it seems to particularly help improve the quality of life while undergoing treatment.

Question #2
Hi Dr John, I am a 32 year old mother of two and I have kind of a weird question. I recently went on an "extreme" roller coaster ride and literally thought I was going to die! I could not stand the movement at that speed. Have I developed an inner ear problem? I really want to ride roller coasters with my kids when they grow up!
Thank you for your time! Melissa


Answer
As we get older we seem to have less tolerance for amusement rides we used to enjoy as kids. Part of the issue could be simple motion sickness, especially since we are not as acclimated to these high motion rides as we were when we were younger. Taking a motion sickness medication, or using natural substances like ginger that cut down on motion sickness, before a ride might help. But it's also possible that the issues noticed on such rides come from a case of vertigo. Vertigo can be a temporary simple thing like an inner ear infection. It can also be a result of something more complicated like Meniere's disease. This type of inner ear issue can be caused by many things, including a viral infection, head trauma or even an auto-immune issue. Motion sickness medications might temporarily help with this. Over the long term other types of medicines could keep it under control but in severe cases surgery might be needed to help improve things. The goal here is to be able to enjoy those rides, especially as your kids get older and more daring!

(Copyright © 2012 NBC Universal, All Rights Reserved)

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