RC vs. mountain bikes: Who owns the trails?

Who owns the trails?

Share the road -- a popular saying here in Colorado when it comes to cars and bikes.

In Jefferson County, some cyclists say they've had to share the trails with a different kind of car -- the remote-controlled kind.

Trails like Deer Creek are open to bikers and even hikers. But in Jefferson County, it’s not the place. For any motorized vehicle including something as small as a remote-control car.

"They do have places they can run those machines," says Matthew George of Front Range Mountain Biking.

He's an avid Biker -- and he says he's seen people racing RC cars on trails and his concern is safety.

"They generally are using these on technical parts of the trail where it will be hard for you to stop so you could go over the handle bars get injured - break bones," George said. He's also thinking about the younger riders in training on the trails.

"Kids tend to be less controlled," he said.

Dustin Graham works at Remote Control Hobbies and races these kinds of cars.

"I try and be respectful of my area and not be in anyone's way," Graham said.

But he admits he has raced in areas he didn't know banned remote control cars -- he thinks there could be a compromise.

"I think that it's something that can be worked out and we can get some more areas that are designated for RC's because as its stands right now there are not a whole lot of areas we can do a lot of that stuff," Graham said.

When racing in the wrong place, he has been told to leave.

"I have had some situations where I have been out on the trails crawling and I have had some mountain bikers come by and a lot of times it will start out pretty hot and hostile but then we'll talk and work things out," Graham said.

Some bikers say if it gets out of hand to just let the proper people handle it.

"We're not Park Rangers," George said, "and we don't want to be."

So whether you enjoy mountain biking or racing with toy cars. There's a reason there is a designated place for each. Both racers and bikers say the overall goal is for people to be safe.

Jefferson County says it is illegal to operate any motorized vehicle on Open Space lands except on designated public roads. Violators could be fined 100 bucks.

© 2017 KUSA-TV


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