Taking a look at new edibles guidelines set to take effect

It's to make things easier on your eyes - by making labeling bigger and bolder.

The people who make and sell marijuana products, like edibles, will have new rules to follow very soon. And it's all to make things easier on your eyes before you pop a brownie or cookie into your mouth.

Labeling will be larger and bolder.

Running a business that produces marijuana edibles and concentrates is something Peggy Moore, C.E.O. of Love’s Oven has been doing since 2009.

The edibles are cooked in the large bakery at the business. After the edible is made it's put into child-proof packaging, which is a state law. At Love's Oven employees take safety to a higher level than they have to.

“Each marked edible we also put into little bag like this and this is not something required by the state but it's something we do just in case the edible got out of the child-resistant packaging,” said Moore.

The state's concern for children goes beyond packaging and the Colorado Department of Revenue says they want to make sure these products are not appealing to children once the seal is broken.

“They are mainly focused on the shapes of edibles,” Moore said.

So, those will change.

“We should no longer allow edibles to be shaped by a human, an animal, or a fruit,” Moore said.

She said most items in those shapes are candies or gummies so the new rules would require manufacturers to buy new molds, and that's not cheap.

“In most cases, it's going to cost you $10,000 minimum to buy the molds for that scale but it could cost up to 100k depending on the amount,” said Moore.

Labels will also be included in the changes on marijuana products.

“One of the new rules effective October 1 is that potency info on the products now need to be highlighted or in large or bolder font on the label,” Moore explained.

As a parent and grandparent, Moore believes stronger regulations are needed, but she also believes there needs to be more education.

“About what it is, what it's not and how to safely utilize the product and to make sure they don't fall into the wrong hands whether a teenager or a product," Moore added.

The state is serious about the changes which take effect on October 1. Any business with items that aren't compliant will have to go in the trash, and strict disposal rules must be followed.

© 2017 KUSA-TV


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment