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The towers and cranes are set up to mimic future greenhouse risings. This will allow scientists to determine how the land will cope with the gas release.

Each tower is nine stories tall. Environmental scientist Steve Wohl says the experiment gives researchers an idea what the Earth will be like in future years.

"The idea is to give us a snapshot of the future to allow researchers to come out and measure what it could be like say in 2050 with an elevated CO2 level of 550 parts per million," Wohl said.

He also talked about the uniqueness of the experiment itself.

"It's the only one of its kind in the world right now that's a large-tree experiment with crane access. The idea is to give us a snapshot of the future to allow researchers to come out and measure what it could be like, say, in 2050 with an elevated CO2 level of 550 parts per million," Wohl said.

Within each tower, the native bush is being exposed to different levels of carbon dioxide. The scaffolding pipes are peppered with holes delivering the extra doses of vaporized CO-d.

Researcher David Ellsworth uses the cranes to sample leaves across the canopy.

"It's an environment that hasn't been explored, like the deep sea hasn't really been explored, and now these cranes offer us the reverse of a deep-sea submarine taking us up into the air and being able to measure those things that are going on at the tops of the trees," Wohl said.

From soil to the sky, the project measures the effects of carbon on the whole ecosystem.

Environmental scientist Catriona MacDonald says soil testing provides a broad understanding of the Earth's ecosystem.

"The soil's kind of the fundamental part of the puzzle because it's where the plants come out of and all the nutrients to sustain the plant growth is within the soil".

Scientists say its taken 12 months to develop the project, and it will last about 10 years.

For more information, you can go to http://www.uws.edu.au/hie/facilities/face.

Nate Chisholm contributed to this report.

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