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Now, the Longmont Housing Authority is terminating her benefits because she included her medical marijuana expenses when she submitted her yearly renewal paperwork.

"It's legal in Colorado now, and I didn't even think twice," Weber said.

She has been renting the home in Longmont with her son for roughly three years. She has remodeled the bathroom and sink to be wheelchair accessible.

A decade ago, she was the passenger when a drunk driver crashed the car she was riding in.

"It stopped my life. My life just had to re-start," she said.

The pain is constant, she says. Medical marijuana, which she consumes in edible form, helps ease that pain.

"It helps me with my spasms," she said.

The Section 8 benefits, administered by the Longmont Housing Authority, are the reason she can afford to live anywhere on her own.

Earlier this month, she received a form saying that her benefits would be terminated.

"[It said] that I wasn't going to get any help," said Weber.

Michael Reis, executive director of the Longmont Housing Authority, didn't want to speak to 9NEWS on camera, but he said benefits were being terminated because in Longmont they have a zero tolerance policy on all schedule one drugs.

The money is administered by Longmont but comes from a voucher program with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

"When I got the letter, I was sick to my stomach," Weber said. "I would have nowhere else to go."

Weber now has an attorney, Jeff Gard, who is working on her behalf pro bono. If Weber's benefits aren't re-instated, he says, they plan to file a lawsuit.

Gard says it's up to each housing authority to determine whether to allow medical marijuana, and he says it would be simple to allow Weber to receive the benefits.

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