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KUSA- The City of Denver is launching a new campaign to reduce the number of crashes between vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock unveiled the Heads Up campaign in early May. He was joined by the mothers of three hit-and-run victims.

Zama Bee's two sons, Ah Zet Kahn and Za May Kahn, were killed when they were struck by an SUV while crossing the street near East 14th Avenue and Yosemite Street in March. Zama Bee was seriously hurt. The driver was never found.

Eriana McLaughlin's daughter Deyondrah was seriously hurt when she was hit by a car while crossing Colfax in late February.

"My life has been turned upside down," McLaughlin said. "Not just mine, I have another younger daughter it has totally affected. Just seeing her in the hospital, making that time to go see her in the hospital everyday when you have another teen at home you need to take care of, working fulltime."

Her daughter is expected to remain in the hospital at least until the end of June.

"These tragedies are among a series of pedestrian accidents that have taken place in Denver this year," Mayor Hancock said. "Since the beginning of 2013 we have seen 117 auto-pedestrian accidents. An increase of nearly 35 percent."

But they aren't the only ones getting hurt. Last year there were 265 auto-bike accidents. The city is joining forces with other agencies and business to launch the Heads Up Campaign to prevent these unnecessary crashes.

"Our safety officials work to enforce our laws with walkers, bikers and drivers alike by warning and ticketing bad behavior. Public works department works to engineer safer roads with appropriate signage, lights, lanes, " Mayor Hancock said.

But they can't do it alone, the Heads Up Campaign asks everyone to take personal responsibility for their safety, by following the rules and looking out for others on the road or in the crosswalks.

"I ask all residents of Denver, our families and our neighborhoods to join us in keeping your head up when walking, biking or driving. Take responsibility for safety, " Hancock said.

Before wrapping Wednesday's event Mayor Hancock made a plea for the person responsible for the deaths of Zama Bee's children to come forward.

"Someone knows what happened to her boys. Let me make a plea, if it's you turn yourself in, " he said. "Whether it was you or not, if you know, help us by solving this mystery."

Police are looking for a white or silver Cadillac Escalade ESV.

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