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SOCHI - For those watching the Olympics, you must have noticed the empty seats at different venues.

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But the organizing committee in Sochi says it is happy with attendance.

Officials say 924,802 tickets have been sold - 70 percent purchased by Russian spectators.

Tickets to skeleton, luge and freestyle are 98 percent sold. Officials say Japan and Germany sold out their ticket quotas. Europe, Canada and the USA have "actively" purchased tickets, the committee said.

The cheapest ticket to the game is 500 rubles, about $16 depending on the rate. Spectators 9NEWS spoke with said those are long gone.

But visitors like Elena Vavdich from Rostov says she's here for the Olympics, and she's here to spend money.

"We came here for the Olympics," she said. "Our country is hosting the Olympics for the second time, I think that's great."

Vavdich bought some of her tickets ahead of time but showed up at the ticket counter on this day hoping for some figure skating and freestyle.

The $600 price tag didn't bother her. But the events she wanted weren't available.

"When it comes to the Olympics, all this is doable and possible," Vavdich said.

But for Tatiana Zubkova from Moscow, price matters. She, along with her husband and son are trying to attend several events. A $200 ticket hits the pocket book.

"Wanted to take our son to ski jumping, but it's too expensive," she said.

While the cheapest ticket is $20, the most expensive is about $1,600. A lot of attention has been given to the empty seats at the venues. The organizing committee says it's not indicative of attendance.

"If you're seeing for empty seats, if you're seeking for pictures of empty seats you will find them of course," Organizing Committee spokeswoman Aleksandra Kosterina said.

Kosterina said many of the venues are sold out, but spectators don't stay for the whole events, choosing to root for only their favorite athletes, or as maybe the case in the mountain cluster, don't stay in their sets, preferring to be closer to the course.

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