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DENVER BUSINESS JOURNAL - Allison Newman walked into her boss's office and said she was done.

It was 2005 and Newman was overwhelmed with long investment banking hours at Wachovia. And she had a baby at home. She couldn't do it anymore. She said she would leave her job and become a town banker, a job that would let her leave at 5 p.m. every day.

To her surprise, her boss looked at her and said, "You're not leaving." He told her the bank would do whatever it took to keep her there — even if it meant more flexible hours and working remotely.

At the time, Newman was a vice president of portfolio management for Wachovia's corporate and investment bank. Now, nine years later, she is the director of the power and utilities corporate banking group for Wells Fargo and has two kids under 10 at home.

Newman, 40, says that moment in her boss's office was a turning point in her career. That was when she realized her superiors valued the talent she brought to the bank enough to make a special arrangement for her.

Read more at the Denver Business Journal: http://bit.ly/1qeOnmP

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