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Proctor's Garden: How to assess storm damage in your garden

Watch the nighttime temperatures when moving your tender plants back outside.

DENVER — If you were smart and covered your tender plants, go ahead and remove the buckets and sheet and access the damage.

Black leaves mean freeze damage. You may be able to save these plants by cutting them back.

But even if your plants didn't freeze, the cold may have stunted the growth of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and warm-season ornamental plants. If they don't snap out of it in the next few weeks, consider starting over.

Most perennials probably weathered the storm alright, but damage could well have happened, depending how cold it got in your area. Leave them alone for now. Many perennials can regenerate from their roots.

Tender annual plants and seedlings can go back outside in their trays to get sunlight. But watch those nighttime temperatures. They must hit and remain at or above 50 degrees for many warm season plants. Bring them back inside at night if necessary. 

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