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Campaign provides 500 meals for people experiencing food insecurity over the holidays

A handful of political and cultural leaders from Denver and Aurora met to prepare the meals and deliver them.

DENVER — Christmas has a way of bridging political divides when it seems not very much can.

The "No One Should Be Hungry, Period" campaign provided 500 meals for people experiencing food insecurity over the holidays.

The meals were spearheaded by Brother Jeff Fard, founder and director of Brother Jeff's Cultural Center in Five Points, and Denver-native 'Big Jon' Platt, the CEO of Sony/ATV Music Publishing.

"COVID has been a very, very devastating virus, globally. And there a lot of people that are struggling to, either, make a decision if they're going to pay their bills or have food, if they're going to get their prescriptions or have food," said Brother Jeff.

The 500 meals were made, packaged and ready for pick-up or delivery from his Cultural Center at 28th Avenue and Welton Street.

A handful of political and cultural leaders from Denver and Aurora met to prepare the meals and deliver them.

That included left-leaning elected leaders like Denver City Councilwoman Candi CdeBaca, Denver Public School Board Member Tay Anderson and Aurora City Council Member Alison Coombs. Standing alongside them was a conservative voice, Aurora City Council Member Françoise Bergan.

"There are lots of things that pull us apart, but there is one thing that can bring us all together, and that's good will and that's the holiday season," said Brother Jeff.

"Maybe, we both, from both ideologies, want the same result for people. We want people to have good jobs, we want people to have housing, and we want people to have food. We come at it from different directions," said Bergan.

The 500 meals were just a portion of the message of the event.

It was also a moment to bring attention to disparities that have been enhanced by the pandemic.

"That vision doesn't stop with food. From the MLK statue in Denver to the MLK statue in Aurora, we need homes. After homes, we need jobs that pay a livable wage so people can live with dignity," said Aurora NAACP President Omar Montgomery.

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