Terrance Carroll, Denver Public Schools' chief legal and strategic initiatives officer, will step down after seven months.

His final day will be Oct. 19. DPS paid him 170,617.52 per year.

Carroll started with the district in April 2018. Prior to that, he worked as an attorney at Butler Snow LLP from August 2016 to March 2018 and has also been division chief for the Colorado Rangers since June 2016, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Carroll was also a legislator and the former speaker of the Colorado House from 2009 to 2011.

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<p>Terrance Carroll on the opening day of the legislature in 2011. </p>

"Although my tenure has been relatively short, the impact on my life and career has been incredibly rewarding," Carroll said. "I've cherished the opportunity to serve the students of the DPS."

Carroll added that he came to DPS to assist Superintendent Tom Boasberg with his "strategic vision for the district." Boasberg announced in July that he would step down from his role after nearly 10 years on the job. The school board is searching for his replacement.

RELATED | Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg stepping down

"After much soul searching I've decided that his departure is an opportunity to utilize my skills as a lawyer and strategist to assist entrepreneurs, non-profits and other businesses to achieve their full potential," Carroll said.

Carroll has been an outspoken defender of actions taken by DPS to defend a group of current and former East High School administrators accused of failing to report a students alleged sexual assault. DPS footed nearly $20,000 in legal bills for those administrators.

RELATED | DPS pays legal bills of East High administrators charged with failing to report alleged sex assault

“The rationale behind it is very simple – that our records indicated that our employees acted in an appropriate fashion when they received reports of the incident that’s at the heart of this,” Carroll said in August. “Our records show that they actually informed the Denver Police Department of those allegations – and they followed every protocol that they were supposed to follow.”