Students of the high school where 17 people were killed on Valentine's Day have been rallying for changes to make schools safer.

Now alumni of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are joining their fight. On Wednesday in Denver about 50 people gathered on the west steps of the state capitol for a candlelight vigil. About half of them once attended the school in Parkland, Fl.

"The alumni that are here today literally formed together in a matter of 6 days," said Dustin Zweibel, an event organizer and 2006 graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas. "We're here and we're going to help them fight the fight to make sure their voices are heard."

Denver's vigil was held on the same day that about 100 survivors of the shooting filled the Florida statehouse calling for changes to gun laws, a ban on assault-type weapons and improved care for the mentally ill.

Federal law already prohibits those under the age of 21 from purchasing handguns from licensed gun dealers. Now some want a similar limit on rifles. That idea is already being met with opposition from the National Rifle Association who says it would deprive young Americans of their constitutional right to self-protection.

Still event organizers remain hopeful that there will be change.

"The reality is it shouldn't happen at any school but Marjory Stoneman Douglas is a unique community," said Zwiebel. "We're the right school because we're not going to stop shouting until our voices are heard."

The group is hosting a fundraiser for the shooting victims and their families on March 9 at Romero's K9 Club & Tap House in Lafayette. They will donate 100% of sales to the official victims' fund.

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