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Coping with the snowstorm's aftermath in your garden

The good news is that it appears tree leaves didn't freeze, so we may yet enjoy some fall color.

DENVER — If you covered your plants, it's likely that many survived the early snow storm. Because we had fair warning, I covered many patio plants and also hauled in dozens and dozens of tropical plants. My little greenhouse is stuffed and so are both porches and nearly every room in the house. 

I hope you picked your vegetables prior to the storm. Green tomatoes should be stored on newspaper--not touching--so they can be used as they ripen. You don't want them to touch because if one rots, it will spread. Refrigerate peppers, cucumbers, eggplant, zucchini and summer squash. 

I also hope you took cuttings. My windowsills are lined with jars of coleus, bloodleaf and impatiens. Once they've rooted, the cuttings can be potted up in soil. An optimistic view is that we've already started our 2021 gardens. If you didn't get a hard freeze, it's still possible to take cuttings. 

Perennials survived the cold but are flat on the ground. Staking will be necessary. The good news is that it appears tree leaves didn't freeze, so we may yet enjoy some fall color.

Although the storm was aggravating and depressing for gardeners, spare a thought for the plight of our farmers. Our hearts go out to them. 

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