WESTMINSTER, Colorado — Eric Trujillo and his wife own Mi Vida Strings in Westminster, and three days ago, they lost power due to the snowstorm.

“We’ve been without power since Wednesday,” Trujillo said. “First thing, we came in and about a half an hour later the power was gone.”

Mi Vida Strings
Byron Reed

The Trujillos were among the hundreds of thousands who lost power because of the "bomb cyclone," which, according to preliminary reports, could be the most intense cyclone to be recorded in Colorado history.

Trujillo has made, repaired and sold violins and other small string instruments in the shop for the past nine years. He said he’s never seen a storm like this one.

“I thought I’d seen it all but that one was a different kind of storm,” Trujillo said. “A little surprised that it would be out this long. I guess I underestimated how widespread the power outages were.”

Mi Vida Strings
Byron Reed

He said violin repairs require a steady hand and going without and heat makes that difficult.

“A steady hand is hard to do when it's shivering cold,” said Trujillo.

Trujillo is also a jazz saxophone player, who's used to making up songs as he goes. This week, he had to do another kind of ad-libbing while his shop was closed due to the cold temperatures.

“Cold weather can affect the varnishes and glues of the violins,” said Trujillo. “Some of our inventory and client instruments have been moved off location to keep them warm.”

Mi Vida Strings
Byron Reed

He said the days away from work have been a little stressful. 

“Two or three days off work can make a big deal and can be a big difference in the wallet, too," he said.

It was an issue neighboring business DAO Architecture wanted to help fix since they still had power, so they offered Trujillo a spot in their office. 

“The firm reached out and was warm and generous, and offered for me to come and work in the shop,” said Trujillo. “We don’t need a lot to do our work, but what we do need is to be proper and work well, so we’re grateful that [they] are letting us work here.”

Mi Vida Strings
Byron Reed

Power was finally restored to Trujillo’s shop after three days, but he said he is grateful to his friends across the street allowing him to keep paying attention to the fine details of the instruments that he loves.

“Maybe that jazz musician in me that knows how to improvise,” said Trujillo. “We improvise in life and some people say it’s 'making lemonade.'”