x

Denver's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Denver, Colorado | 9NEWS.com

There's even a Women's March in Antarctica

“I set it up because I wanted to participate in the Women’s March,” Zunas told the Independent. “I spent a month after the election mourning the impending damage to the Earth that will be done. I felt like I needed to do something to be part of the global movement.”
<p><span style="color: rgb(100, 100, 100); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(250, 250, 250);">As millions gathered for women’s marches in Washington, D.C. and around the world, a cold, brave group of protesters also assembled — in Antarctica.</span><span style="color: rgb(100, 100, 100); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(250, 250, 250);"> </span><span class="credit" style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(100, 100, 100); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; background-color: rgb(250, 250, 250);">(Photo: Courtesy of Linda Zunas)</span></p>

“I set it up because I wanted to participate in the Women’s March,” Zunas told the Independent. “I spent a month after the election mourning the impending damage to the Earth that will be done. I felt like I needed to do something to be part of the global movement.”

Zunas told the Independent the marchers range in age from 24 to 87 and include both men and women.

Linda Zunas told USA TODAY on Twitter that people on the ship "tried to do a small march in Paradise Bay as part of one of our landings. It was about 30 feet along an established tourist trail."

Zunas posted a picture of the group holding signs ranging from “penguins for peace” to “save the planet.” Zunas, of Oakland, Calif., told the Independent she felt compelled to organize the march in response to President Trump's apparent plans to roll back Obama-era environmental policies.

389544024