x
Breaking News
More () »

Denver 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D: Bonds to fund facilities, housing, parks, transportation

These are four out of five bond questions on the Denver ballot in the Nov. 2 coordinated election.

DENVER — This story is part of a series of statewide ballot issue reviews we're calling "We Don't Have To Agree, But Let's Just Vote."  We'll continue to look at statewide ballot initiatives on Colorado's ballot and how they would impact you.

Click here for more Voter Guide coverage for the 2021 election.

Denver is asking its voters for permission to borrow about $450 million total in five debt questions on Nov. 2, which are Referred Questions 2A through 2E on the ballot.

Questions 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D ask voters to approve general obligation bonds to fund repairs and improvements to city facilities, housing and sheltering, parks and recreation, and transportation and mobility.

The total cost of the four is $259 million. The money to repay the bonds would come from the city's general revenues, though the city could increase taxes at some point to pay them back.

RELATED: Denver Question 2E: $190 million in bonds to pay for National Western Complex project

Click here to read for a Denver sample ballot and to read the language of the bond questions.

Referred Question 2A

This question asks voters to approve $104,040,000 for repairs and improvements to city facilities.

That includes:

  • Improvements at the Denver Zoo, Denver Botanic Gardens, Bonfils Theater Complex and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.
  • Construction of two libraries in the Globeville and Westwood neighborhoods, and expansion of the Hampden Branch Library.
  • Upgrades to city buildings to meet accessibility standards for people with disabilities.
  • Improvements to the Youth Empowerment Center building.
  • Renovations to the May Bonfils Stanton Theater and the Temple Buell Theater.

A YES vote means you want the city to borrow $104,040,000, with a maximum repayment cost of $179,175,000, to fund the repairs and improvements listed above.

A NO vote means the city cannot borrow the money to pay for the projects.

Proponents say 2A invests in cultural institutions, local libraries and more that belong to all Denver residents. Funding improvements keeps those facilities accessible for generations.

Opponents say 2A will further increase property taxes in Denver and price lower income workers out of the area, after housing costs have already seen a big increase in the metro area.

Referred Question 2B

This question asks voters to approve $38,600,000 for repairs and improvements to the city's housing and sheltering system.

That includes:

  • The purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, which would keep the space operational 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • The purchase, and conversion or construction, of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters.
  • Improvements to shelters that are currently operational to address gaps in the shelter system during emergency conditions.

A YES vote means you want the city to borrow $38,600,000 to fund the repairs and improvements listed above.

A NO vote means the city cannot borrow the money to pay for the project.

Proponents say 2B will help the city continue its efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver, which has seen an increase in people experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Opponents say the city has already put a lot of money toward this issue without improvement.

Referred Question 2C

This question asks voters to approve $63,320,000 for repairs and improvements to the city's transportation and mobility system.

That includes:

  • Building out bicycle infrastructure with new construction in the Globeville, Elyria-Swansea, South and Central neighborhoods.
  • Addressing sidewalk construction, and pedestrian and transportation safety, throughout the city. Denver has 300 miles of sidewalk gaps that 2C will address, with an emphasis on underserved neighborhoods.
  • Funding the reconstruction of Morrison Road and multi-modal improvements along Peoria Street.
  • Spurring the development of a 5280 Urban Trail through neighborhoods in downtown Denver.

A YES vote means you want the city to borrow $63,320,000 to fund the repairs and improvements listed above.

A NO vote means the city cannot borrow the money to pay for the projects.

Proponents say 2C addresses pressing transportation issues and that it's important for Denver to prioritize transportation options and accessibility. They say an increase in bicycle and pedestrian traffic will decrease vehicle traffic and pollution.

Opponents say the city provides transportation options where they're not needed, such as bike lanes where people don't bike. They also say repairs to the city's sidewalks have been a failure and are years behind schedule.

Referred Question 2D

This question asks voters to approve $54,070,000 for repairs and improvements to the city's parks and recreation system.

That includes:

  • Construction of parks at University Hills and at East 47th Drive and Walden Street. 
  • Reconstruction of the Mestizo-Curtis Pool in the Five Points area.
  • Replacement of playgrounds at Harvey Park, Huston Lake Park, Dailey Park and Crestmoor Park.
  • Replacement of basketball courts, tennis courts and baseball fields at 12 parks around Denver.
  • Renovation of the Sloan's Lake boathouse.
  • Construction and improvement of public restrooms and park maintenance facilities.

A YES vote means you want the city to borrow $54,070,000 to fund the repairs and improvements listed above.

A NO vote means the city cannot borrow the money to pay for the projects.

Proponents say 2D gets the city closer to its goal of all residents living within a 10-minute walk of a high-quality park.

Opponents say Denver voters approved the Elevate Denver plan in 2017 that was intended in part to revitalize parks, playgrounds and recreation centers and that the city's 2020 report indicates 40% of that money hasn't been spent.

RELATED: Housing and taxes: The local questions on ballots across the state

RELATED: Voter Guide 2021: Everything you need to know about the election in Colorado

RELATED: Interactive map: All the polling places and ballot drop boxes in Colorado

SUGGESTED VIDEOS: Politics