DENVER — The transportation startup, Arrivo that promised a hyperloop-inspired network of levitating pods in the Denver metro, and a test track off of E-470 shut down at the end of 2018, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation. 

"I think this was just about money," CDOT Spokesperson Amy Ford said. 

The tech website, The Verge, reported that the company wasn't able to secure more funding. 

9NEWS tried to reach out to Arrivo in October and again Monday after founder Brogan BamBrogan said a test track would be built in the fall of 2018, but is still nowhere to be found. 

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In the November 2017 press conference, BamBrogan told reporters "the idea that you could have dinner in Castle Rock and dessert in Boulder without even thinking about it, we want to unlock that choice." 

His company was awarded a $267,000 from the Colorado Office of Economic Development, but they could only collect on that cash if they brought 152 jobs to Commerce City for their testing facility. 

"No CDOT money was in Arrivo," Ford said. "So no state money was in this kind of technology, nor is it with Hyperloop One or others." 

Ford says the relationship does continue with a different rapid speed transit company. 

Virgin Hyperloop One says their levitating pods could travel at speeds up to 700 mph, and told 9NEWS in an email statement Monday, they are "working on the finishing touches of the feasibility study now and still remain committed to exploring with CDOT how hyperloop can be implemented in the state of Colorado." 

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NOTE: (Because we knew everyone was wondering.) Brogan BamBrogan is not the Arrivo founder's original name. He changed his name from Kevin Brogan when he married his wife, Bambi, so they could combine their names.

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